• Assimilate and integrate the knowledge in a developing field of protein science to deliver a presentation or formulate a literate essay.
  • Calculate association constants, given tables or graphs of raw data from experiments.
  • Choose and explain a suitable method to analyze the binding interaction of proteins with small molecules or between proteins.
  • Develop a knowledge of the subtleties of amino acid function within the whole protein context. (Post-translation modifications of side chains).
  • Develop an appreciation of particular techniques in protein science that are unavailable to students in the context of Dalhousie undergraduate program.
  • Discuss the necessity of protein turnover within cells and organisms and the degradative and regulatory mechanisms that govern protein turnover.
  • Formulate a literate essay.
  • Identify how post-translational modifications modulate the biophysical and the chemical properties of amino acid side chains to expand the functionality of proteins, particularly enzymes.
  • Recall principles of redox equivalent transfers within respiratory chains.
  • Deliver an effective oral presentation.
  • Analyze the detailed mechanism for the generation of the proton motive force across bioenergetic membranes.
  • Organize an effective literature search and apply it to a presentation or an essay.
  • Understand the established principles of protein folding.
  • Design a protein engineering experiment to answer questions about structure/function relationships in new protein.
  • Explain the biophysics of the non-covalent forces and kinetics and mechanisms governing protein folding and stability.
  • Apply the principles underlying structure and folding of simple soluble proteins to the more complex physical environment in which membrane proteins operate.